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Nefertiti Tutorial by CaroleHumphreys Nefertiti Tutorial by CaroleHumphreys
I've been prompted into creating this after receiving a comment requesting I show the work in progress from my last drawing (sadly, I never scanned any stages in the WIP for that one); but as I had kept my progress on file from my Nefertiti drawing, I felt I could piece them together as a form of tutorial on approaching a historically themed work.
It may be useful as a guide to support the importance of doing research and also to show problem-solving when something is not going right :)

I promise to do a more thorough tutorial which will concentrate on my drawing technique, but that will have to be for a future drawing (the one after the next!!!).

I must give credit again to the following stock providers, to which I'm greatly indebted:
:iconvisualgraffiti-stock:
:iconpersephonestock:
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:iconvoblin:
Voblin Featured By Owner May 8, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It is always interesting - to see how occur some amazing things
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner May 9, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you :)
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:iconainhoaortez:
AinhoaOrtez Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The drawing itself was already impressive, but the way you created it it's even more magical! Congratulations :D
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you :)
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:iconastraldreamer:
astraldreamer Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I'll never be able to produce a drawing this detailed as I dont' have the patience. But I loved reading your tutorial as it was just interesteing to see how you went about it and what you were thinking through the process. Thanks for that little insight.
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Never say never, Jenni. I think your art has progressed phenomenally, you have a good eye with the camera and in your art too; you know how to create a strong composition. I believe you will get better and better. When I see some of my earlier works I'm amazed at the difference to what I'm doing now; I think spending a little longer on each piece was a good way forward for me :)

Thank you for the lovely comment :hug:
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:iconastraldreamer:
astraldreamer Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
And thankyou for the lovely comment. I'm planning to do some watercolour painting today and your words couldnt' have come at a better time. :heart:
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:iconeviljimi:
EvilJIMI Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
WOW really cool! Love looking at your art.
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you :heart:
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:iconphoneix-faerie:
Phoneix-Faerie Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
really amazing to see, great work :)
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you so much :heart:
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:iconphoneix-faerie:
Phoneix-Faerie Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
You're welcome
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:iconhoshisamavalmor:
HoshisamaValmor Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012
once again, seeing the actual process of the drawing just makes me look at the finished piece with even more awe and respect. And in this case, the amount of historical research behind it... I can only congratulate you for your skills and talent :iconclapplz:
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you. It's a tricky thing trying to conjure up the past, whether you should be as authentic as possible or allow your artistic license to have it's way - I think this drawing has a bit of both :D
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:iconhenu-chan:
Henu-Chan Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is so cool! thanks :love:
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you :heart:
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:iconmagpie-poet:
magpie-poet Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012
:jawdrop: I suspect that everything is a little too delicate/gentle for the time, but it's beyond gorgeous. *has no words*
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you. Yes, I think there's a lot of artistic license at play here :)
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:iconkarinclaessonart:
KarinClaessonArt Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Absolutely stunning!!
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Many thanks :love:
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:iconkarinclaessonart:
KarinClaessonArt Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
You're very welcome:heart:
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:iconmayumiogihara:
MayumiOgihara Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Awesome and beautiful tutorial! Thank you so much for sharing!!
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you :hug:
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:iconmayumiogihara:
MayumiOgihara Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
My pleasure!
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:icondocredfield:
DocRedfield Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
wonderfully done!
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks Scott :heart:
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:iconmjwilliam:
MJWilliam Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
A great tutorial! :clap:
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you :heart:
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012
Start with the fiddle, then add the twiddle.... ;) Just kidding. great tutorial. One of my favourite of your drawings, too.
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks, Gordon. If it hadn't been for your providing invaluable feedback throughout that drawing, I wouldn't have had enough images to compile this, let alone finish the drawing so well :D

Oh yes, when I get around to doing the proper tutorial, there will be plenty of fiddly-twiddling (possible quote: 'Why settle for a plain & uncomplicated background when you can fill it with a forest of lichen-covered trees. And don't forget to add an A-Z of animals hidden among the branches.')
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012
Yes, that's the way to do it :D
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:iconrockinfroggi:
Rockinfroggi Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012
Nice one Carole, this is one area I need to start working on soon. I've been happy to be a rather dodgy human photocopier up to this point as my aim was just to improve my pencil skills but once I get my commissions out of the way I really need to start developing my imagination and creativity.

This is a great reference for just understanding the stages and also your thought process as you advance. As for your spelling, :facepalm: This would have received 10/10 but now I can only award you 5/10.:iconglomppokeplz:
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
There's nothing dodgy about your skills, Gary. If I hadn't wanted to emulate some of the very talented 'copiers' on DA, I would have never developed as I have as an artist ... I think I just got to a certain level as a copier and realised I could use that skill to kind of fabricate images too & to place things together in compositions (hehe maybe mine is the traditional art version of photomanipulation, but more long-winded in approach). :D

Haha re my careless spelling. No one would believe I have a First Class Hons Degree in English, and a MA to boot. Being clever is one thing, but remembering to engage my brain is too challenging. All the same, I appreciate the generous 5/10
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:icondarktoys:
darktoys Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012
excellent...impressive work !
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you :)
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:iconlaellis:
LAEllis Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
its a very nice tutorial, i admire artists that create rather than recreate (something i cannot seem to do). Your drawings are always very soft, what paper, blending & shading techniques do you use? Perspective always seems to be an issue with artist when creating, are all yours freehand? i dont see any markings or grid lines hidden away :D

Overall great tutorial, ill be sure to keep an eye out for more.
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you :)

I usually use Bristol Board which has a brilliant white smooth surface and can take a lot of punishment when it comes to corrections.

With regards to blending & shading, I use a wide range of Derwent Graphic Studio pencils - I find it's better to build the shading up gradually to achieve the right level of tone - If I were working on a face, I'd probably use pencils ranging from 4H-6H mainly and then introduce darker tones by switching to 2H (then H, HB, B, 2B, etc., depending on how dark I need things to be). I use a clean tissue to smooth things out, especially on faces. I tend to use a cross-hatch technique, shading in one direction & then shading on top from a different direction.

For very dark areas, I use pencils ranging from 2B-9B, again, building things up in stages. When building up dark areas, the surface of the paper can reach an exhaustion point where it's hard to add more pencil lead, when that happens, I carefully mask of the surrounding area and spray fixative on the dark area, which then allows me to work that area some more, making it even darker or blacker.

Perspective can be problematic, if especially, like me, you try to combine images sourced from several references - many years ago, in High school, I received a very useful Art lesson about creating group pictures where you lightly draw a line across the page and consider it the 'eye-line' for your figures - and then when you draw anyone of an average height, you would ensure their eyes fall on the eye-line (for shorter or taller people, you would have their eyes accordingly, below or above the eye-line). As an exercise in this, we cut out figures from magazines and glued them in place on the paper, overlapping when one figure needed to be further away than another; we then used our collages as a reference for a drawing of a crowd scene. Later in Art School, I received numerous lessons on perspective, which helps a lot too, of course :D

The majority of my drawings are totally freehand. Occasionally, when I'm asked to do a portrait of someone's granny/child/wife etc. and if time's against me, I will use the grid system to plot the outlines and as a guide to see where the eyes need to go, etc., but then I usually rub out the grid lines and rely on my judgement from then on. There are anomalies in my drawings - for example, in my 'Lady of Shalott' drawing, I made her body far too long (the result of sitting at a desk with the work flat, instead of on a slope ... well, I was at my place of employment at the time! I normally do artwork on my bed, which allows me to see over it properly, and allows me to spread all my pencils and art supplies around me ((plus it's very comfortable!))

Sorry for the long reply :)
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Ooh! My spelling! Sarcophagus ... Armarna ... hope there's no more (other than jewellery, which I insist on spelling with two L's for some reason, and can't break that habit).
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